Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Yesterday I presented a “case study” reflecting on my journey of embedding 360 blended learning into a third-year physiotherapy paper. This was at the inaugural #Sotelnz conference held at AUT University, Auckland- with over 70 delegates attending. While there were some similarities to the collaborative presentation at ASCILITE 2017, this presentation was focused on the changing from a Teaching Led tutorial to a Student Led approach that incorporated an online integrated learning experience.
As this was something developed over 6 months ago- I was regretting not reflecting at the time the process that I had journeyed through. As with all changes, it was met with some challenges. There was the need to ensure that there was consistency with other content delivered within the paper; buy-in from the Paper Coordinator that I could run with it; as too the students- this was something that was new to us all- and was different in delivery from what the students were familiarised with the previous two and a half years of their physiotherapy programme. It took some learning (and many drafts of the environment) in order to facilitate the presentation of the online environment as clearly and concisely as possible.
In the presentation, I outlined my initial apprehensions in delivering using a blended learning approach. Before reading more about what blending learning actually incorporated and how was defined- I naively believed I was already utilising elements of blended learning. It is hard to relay that in a presentation to peers- though, there it is…
I looked back at some of the presentations that I had presented prior to commencing #MosoMelt and #CMALTcMOOC- and is personally encouraging to see some differences- both for the purpose of presenting, though more importantly, what has been utilised in my teaching over the past year- links to Google Drive; inclusion of QR Codes and TinyURL or Bit.ly links; embedding of video, use of the 360 camera and online editing software (www.seakbeak.com; http://www.storyboardthat.com)- even inclusion of Twitter hashtags and names… much to the surprise of @thomcochrane!
My last reflection of this presentation was that I felt… …“at home”. Here I was with like-minded people that shared a common passion- and concern- about the future of tertiary and secondary education. Here were people who were demonstrating consideration of how education is delivered, rather than being constrained to just the content. It was nice to hear Keynote speaker Professor Peter Scott (University of Technology Sydney) mention that “If you are thinking about teaching without the content being the focus, you are starting to consider teaching in a new way…”. This is something that needs to be strongly highlighted in the changing face of tertiary education and expectations of both institute management as well as the next generation of digital-ready learners entering university.
Makes you think- “Are we ready…” More importantly- “Am I ready…”?
SoTEL Twitter Shot Stretton

Posted by & filed under #BirthTrauma18, #BirthTrauma18 #BirthTrauma, academia, Compassion, Conferences, Mental Health, midwifery.

birth trauma study day

The first week back in January and I am invited by the wonderful becca moore @dr_bjm to share some research thoughts and ideas at the 3rd annual birth trauma study day in London = 

First of all..thank you for arranging and facilitating this day. It really is growing in strength and popularity year on year as this topic gathers momentum. You are a true #maternityleader for making this happen. Thank you also to those who participated in such important debates and discussion…and to those supported me to present my work as a new mum (baby Loveday is now 6 weeks old and as you can see….she was able to join her mum on stage 🙂

Image may contain: 1 person

The discussions that followed on Twitter were also pretty awesome and continue to thrive online. I can see may collaborations being born out of this day…what change may come I wonder? – #BirthTrauma19 will be even bigger and better…that’s for sure!

What struck me most about the speakers involved in this conference, is that every one of us was drawing from some kind of personal experience. Our past traumas had been turned into passion…fire and fury to make a change in the world…to make is better for the next person in some way.

“We had turned our wounds into wisdom.” – Me

Thank you to those who engaged in my presentation. I was thrilled to share some of my PhD work and the findings of other research studies to raise awareness of psychological distress in midwifery populations. The beautiful images below capture some of the key messages from my slides.

selfcare

small things

64%

Further statistics around midwives at work can be found here.

Traumatised midwives

compassion fatigue

I also really enjoyed the ethical debates around providing online anonymity and confidentiality for midwives in psychological distress who wish to seek help. You can read the wider arguments for this here. Do you have any further thoughts on this? I would love to hear them!

Once again…Thank you so much to everyone for making this event so amazing. The quote that I believe summed up the vibe in the room was this…shared by @millihill .

 

“If we can find ways of harvesting the energy in women’s oceanic grief we shall move mountains.” –Germaine Greer

🎓🌟😀

Overall take home messages…

  • Tailored care is needed for every family
  • A healthy baby is not ALL that matters
  • Good outcomes include good psychological outcomes
  • Kindness and compassion cost nothing yet can really make a difference
  • Appropriate use of language can make or break the birthing experience
  • The power of listening can never be underestimated
  • We must remember that fathers and wider family members may also be affected by trauma in the birth room.
  • A traumatic experience is always subjective. What is traumatic for some, may be unremarkable for others.
  • Mothers can have a positive experience of a clinically complicated birth, or a traumatic experience of a seemingly straightforward birth.
  • Any past trauma can always be re-awoken
  • The best care is delivered by a workforce that is healthy and cared for.

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤


Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

This week I presented a concise podium paper (ASCILITE-2017-Proceeding Cochrane & Stretton.pdf) alongside @thomcochrane at the ASCILITE Conference (#ASCILITE17)  held at the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia.
The paper was a collaborative submission between Centre for Learning and Teaching (CfLAT) (Thom Cochrane & Vickel Narayan), Nursing (Sally Britnell), Paramedicine (Duncan Christie, Stephen Aiello, Stuart Cook) and Physiotherapy (myself). It presented the benefits of interprofessional learning (IPL) as well as barriers we encounter in promoting and teaching interprofessional clinical practice (such as location across campuses, different clinical language/ jargon). It is these barriers that has led to students potentially feeling challenged and unprepared when entering clinical and as a new practitioner.
We proposed championing a model using augmented reality. The above clinical discipline staff met to plan an environment in 360 degrees that linked the same case scenario of a youth concussion. While each environment fulfilled the requirements of a specific discipline (e.g. sideline assessment of concussion and ankle ligamentous injury), generic case scenario  information could be utilised by the other disciplines as they identified and prioritised what was needed to hand over. They could also see the progression of the case through the environments and better identify the roles and barriers to each discipline.
It is intended that this will be used to model other interprofessional learning scenarios created by the lecturers- and after a series of reviews utilising a modified education design research model- would lead to having students create a collaborative scenario between disciples.
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We had some great questions at the time of the presentation, and follow up conversations throughout the remainder of the conference. I was fortunate enough to also be asked to assist in facilitating a workshop on AV and VR (also utilising Twitter, Google Street View, SeekBeak and WondaVR).578AAC9D-7F22-499F-BDB6-DECD6FFB3AA4.png

Posted by & filed under academia, Conferences, higher education, jobs, Research & writing tips, Student Tips, Tips.

This wisdom comes from the 10th annual ‘Life beyond the PhD’ conference () hosted at Cumberland Lodge. I was lucky enough to win a scholarship to attend and gather a multitude of hints and tips for my academic career…Now I plan to share them here for those who wish to read them…

Tip One: Potential employers will want to know how they will benefit from having you work with them as much as, if not more than, how you will benefit from working with them. Why should they invest their money in you? Will they be able to tolerate you on a daily basis? This means that you will need to come across as unselfish, and avoid saying the same thing as everyone else…be different!

Tip Two: Avoid jargon, and make sure you back up your claims with lived examples! For instance..It is no use saying that your I.T skills are fabulous if you don’t back this up with a real lived example of how you have used your I.T skills to do something of real value.

Tip Three: A potential employer will only take a few seconds to scan your CV. Therefore, you need to cut out the gimmicks, reduce it to no more than a couple of pages and make sure that you have used clear and easy to read formatting. Everything on your CV should be in reverse chronological order, and tailored to the job you are applying for. Your cover letter should never be a replication of your CV, yet it should hold lived examples of the skills you have presented.

Tip four: Within your interview,  it will not necessarily matter what answer you give to any awkward interview questions, as long as your answers are void of generic jargon and backed up with a sound rationale for your choice. Also, it is important not to pretend that either you or your research is impervious to failure…what matters is how you handle things and learn.

Tip five: Be yourself, and be honest about any career gaps…being evasive over these issues will only arouse suspicions…the truth is always far more welcome….It’s often not as big a deal as you think, and a good employer will appreciate what you are planning to do to get back on track.

For further hints and tips see this early career researcher blog.

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 


Posted by & filed under academia, Conferences, Research.

The virtual international conference, hosted by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM)  is the first online conference focused on the subject of qualitative research. I gravitated towards this as something new, exciting and inclusive. Plus, as my new daughter has just been born….a virtual online conference seemed to be the perfect way to share my latest work and breastfeed at the same time.

The poster I presented was:

Exploring the perceptions of new mother’s in relation to psychological distress and workplace support in midwifery. A Patient and Public Involvement study

I was representing The Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course at Coventry University. This work was formed in partnership with Dr. Gemma Pearce and Dr. Elizabeth Bailey, also from Coventry University.

Qual-World Interactive Virtual Conference

The conference theme was: Qualitative Research Across Boundaries

Keynote Speakers:

Prof. Amanda Kenny, La Trobe University, Australia
Prof. Trish Greenhalgh, University of Oxford, UK
Prof. Martyn Hammersley, The Open University, UK
Prof. Babette Babich, Fordham University, The Jesuit University of New York City

Here are a few snapshots of the keynote speeches…

As an early career researcher (post-doc) I really appreciated the insights shared in relation to progressing an academic career and thriving in a research centre. The idea that collaborations and publications can be planned to achieve maximum impact really appeals to me…. a few hints and tips in the right direction were very welcome.

I have yet to use or explore storytelling and narratives in my research career thus far in any great depth. As such, it was really inspiring to see how these have been used in other qualitative work. Ethnography is also an area fairly new to me, and so being introduced to new topics in this way really helped me to digest and think about new directions for my own research.

Then, to  fall in love with philosophy again was wonderful…looking at what makes science….science….within the terminology of the postmodern? Lot’s to think about here. And certainly lot’s to discuss. The online chat room was on the go throughout the conference, and on Twitter. The conversations really made me think about my own future directions in research and how it may be grounded.

Yet the best thing about this conference for me was the fact that it has been so accessible for me. Having just had a new baby girl, this conference gave me the chance to share new findings from our PPI study from the comfort of home. This meant that I could care for my baby and breastfeed whilst not missing out on the career I love. Thank you to the conference organizers for making this possible. …and thank you to the Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course for funding my place.

As you can see, this tweet of my experience was the most popular one of the conference… I think that these accessible conferences are really making history and showing the way for future conferences of this type.

In conclusion…I would like to reiterate the following tweet:

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤


Posted by & filed under CMALT, Future Plans.

This week we cover an overview of digital publishing formats and CMALT portfolio submission requirements. We hope you have enjoyed your participation in #CMALTcMOOC, and although the 7 weeks comes to an end this is just the beginning for the community that has been established! We hope that you now have an understanding of what is required for producing a CMALT portfolio, and encourage you to continue working on developing and sharing your portfolios. You are invited to further PD cMOOCs such as Mosomelt 2018 and the next iteration of #CMALTcMOOC (March 2018). You are also invited to take part in a final participant survey to give us feedback. This week we will also host our final Participant Hangout reflecting upon their CMALT cMOOC experience.

cMOOC Feedback Invitation:

We want to get your feedback on how we can improve #CMALTcMOOC. We have an information sheet, consent form, and online survey for your feedback. Also, if you are willing to let us use your CMALT portfolio as an example there is also a portfolio showcase opt-in. The links are:

Info Sheet: http://bit.ly/1XywKQ5

Consent Form: http://bit.ly/26bPN4B

Survey: https://goo.gl/forms/cDhKGbGbudf221312

Portfolio showcase option: http://goo.gl/forms/J629u943tGsM4OGy2

 

 

Remember to check out the growing list of examples for the CMALT Portfolio sections in the Project Bank at https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/

While the “Future Plans” section is not assessed you must complete it. This can be as detailed as you like. The purpose of this is to help you plan for your professional development; it will also be useful when preparing to meet your continuing professional development requirement to remain in good standing.

 

This week we will also look at an overview of digital publishing formats suitable for an ePortfolio to be submitted for CMALT accreditation. Portfolios can be submitted for review by three different dates throughout the year: 31 January, 31 May, and 30 September https://www.alt.ac.uk/certified-membership/submitting-portfolio


Posted by & filed under Choosing a Specialisation, CMALT.

This week we explore participants’ individual areas of specialisation in learning technologies. Use the Project Bank https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/ to share a Blog post or VODCast describing an area of specialisation relevant to your context.

We will also schedule a Hangout later in the week where participants can discuss and share their specialisations.

Reflect upon why you have chosen this specialisation?

Comment on one another’s PODCasts or VODCasts giving feedback.

As well as the core areas, CMALT candidates are required to demonstrate evidence of independent practice in one or more specialist options. This reflects the fact that, although there are common areas of work for learning technologists, practice is extremely diverse and everyone specialises in something different.

Your specialist topic should reflect an area where you have particular expertise. This may be unique to you or common across your team, but goes beyond what would be expected of any learning technologist.

In describing your specialist option you should refer to the CMALT principles and values:

  1. A commitment to exploring and understanding the interplay between technology and learning.
  2. A commitment to keep up to date with new technologies.
  3. An empathy with and willingness to learn from colleagues from different backgrounds and specialist options.
  4. A commitment to communicate and disseminate effective practice.
Because these are specialist options you should be clear what makes your work distinct from common practice; many people teach on online courses, but designing and delivering fully online courses requires specific skills and would be considered specialist. . Similarly, many teachers provide blended learning, but developing and sharing guidelines for such practice or working with a distinctive blend of contexts might distinguish your work as specialist. It may be that your specialist option is common amongst the group that you work in as you all work in a similar area; that is perfectly acceptable.Evidence for your specialist activity is likely to be very specific but could include: reports, papers or presentations you have written; this could be backed up by a job description plus written statements supporting your specialist knowledge from colleagues, clients or managers; active membership of professional or other bodies; certificates of completion of specialist training programmes or courses.