Posted by & filed under Conferences and publications, learning design, Training.

Written by Jim Lusted, Learning Designer

I recently attended a workshop hosted by Northampton Students’ Union (SU) and facilitated by the National Union of Students (NUS) where SU staff, academics and student representatives were introduced to a project called the ‘Greener Curriculum’. This is certainly a more catchy title than the more commonly used term Education for Sustainable Development – shortened to ESD – which represents an area of activity gaining increasing prominence across the HE sector.

 

What is sustainability?

At the start of the workshop we were asked to define ‘sustainability’. Most of us immediately came up with environmental issues such as recycling, creating less waste, energy efficiency and so on, but we were also encouraged to consider the social and economic aspects of sustainability that we might not immediately recognise. This makes up what has been termed the ‘3 pillars’ of sustainability, or the ‘triple bottom line’ of people, planet and profit.

This holistic approach is reflected in the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals that were adopted in 2015 to commit nation states to take action not only on high profile ‘green’ issues like climate change, but also concerns such as social equality, poverty, protecting life (human and non-human), and ensuring a quality education for all.

Education and sustainability

These are all unarguably worthy causes, but what role might universities play in promoting sustainability? The workshop asked us to consider this in relation to our own circumstances at Northampton. The NUS defines ESD as ‘education that aims to give students the knowledge and skills to live and work sustainably’, and their vision behind ESD is to ensure students leave higher education being part of the solution rather than the problem when it comes to tackling some of the big issues mentioned above.

The NUS have commissioned research that shows that two thirds of students want to have sustainability issues embedded into their programmes:

 

“Sustainable development is something universities should actively incorporate and promote.”
(NUS 2018)

Students want to engage with the big challenges of our times through their studies – be it environmental, social or economic – and they want to explore ways they positively influence the world around them.

Education for sustainable development @ University of Northampton

As the workshop progressed, many of the participants noted the apparent similarities between the guiding principles of ESD and the ideals that underpin Northampton’s status as an AshokaU ‘Changemaker’ campus. Indeed, one of the manifesto commitments of a Changemaker campus refers explicitly to sustainability:

“Operating in socially and environmentally conscious ways to model changemaking for students and other institutions and contribute to the vitality of people and the planet”

(AshokaU 2018)

We felt that Northampton might be particularly well suited to embedding ESD into the curriculum when channelled explicitly through the Changemaker agenda. This academic year, as part of the UMF assessment review, all modules have been required to articulate revised learning outcomes, including some directly attributed to Changemaker values. This gives teaching staff a real chance to reflect on how they are embedding such values into their curriculum and where they are providing students with opportunities to explore some core principles of sustainability in their studies.

Embedding ESD in the curriculum – some ideas

We were given a number of useful resources and tips during the workshop to help consider how and where ESD could be embedded into teaching practice and curricula. Firstly, although some courses may be more aligned to ESD principles than others, like the social sciences (indeed, courses like Geography are likely to have sustainability as a core topic), we were encouraged to consider how every subject has the potential to include ESD perspectives. A really useful A-Z guide, called #sustainabilityAtoZ has been produced by the NUS to showcase examples across the breadth of academic disciplines where ESD has been embedded into programmes. Similarly, a website called www.dissertationsforgood.org.uk has recently been set up by the NUS as an attempt to try to bring together dissertation students with local and national organisations – with a view to creating dissertation topics and projects that can have a direct impact on the ‘real world’.

The future for ESD

It seems like many of the big issues facing the HE sector at the moment – debates about ‘value for money’, student satisfaction, graduate employment and so on – lend themselves to ESD being given ever higher profile in future higher education policy and curriculum design. Our workshop discussed several examples of universities across England who had undertaken big reviews of their own university wide curricula (much like our UMF review) to better align graduate attributes and skills more closely to ESD principles such as social responsibility and impact. With all this in mind, I expect we will be hearing much more about the idea of a ‘greener curriculum’. I personally really welcome the renewed interest developing a social conscience among students through their studies, and at Northampton in particular I see a real opportunity for us to creatively explore the ways in which ESD values can help bring the ‘Changemaker’ agenda into our teaching at the University.

Posted by & filed under 1819, LearnTech News, modules, NILE, NILE standards, programme sites.

We are pleased to announce that your 1819 module and programme sites have been created and are now ready to receive your content, so you can self-enrol now.

This year (as last) we have again chosen to differentiate between courses taught at the University and those delivered by our academic partners, to reflect the different needs of all concerned and so LearnTech has developed and updated separate templates, making for a more tailored student (and staff) experience.

The template and NILE Standards have been updated for 2018-19 following recommendations approved at the University’s Student Experience Committee and Faculty SECs. Please refer to these for up-to-date guidance on what to include in which section of your NILE sites when preparing them for the coming academic year.

You will note that in-site guidance has again been streamlined to allow for any necessary dynamic updates throughout the academic year, incorporating links to existing support, thus avoiding duplication and avoiding potentially conflicting advice. We have again included the ‘Support for Tutors’ and ‘Support for Students’ resources lists, so please also refer to these for your own assistance and for that of your students.

The template is designed to build on last year’s updating of content: you should therefore all find yourselves in a strong position for this year’s plan to copy over only what is required for the coming years teaching.  N.B. If you are using Pearsons content, please do not copy over any site content without first contacting Learning Technology.

For those of you unfamiliar with the process of preparing your sites for the coming year, we have provided updated guidance on how to do this, as well as having Learning Technology team members on standby should you require extra support and assistance. Please email LearnTech Support in the first instance or contact your designated LearnTech.

Posted by & filed under #internationaldayofthemidwife, academia, EDS, Ehlers-danlos syndrome, hEDS, midwifery, My Projects, My Research, Publications, Research.

 or ‘International Day of the Midwife’ falls on May the 5th of every year. The theme for 2018 in three languages is…

  • Midwives leading the way with quality care
  • Sages-femmes, ouvrons la voie avec la qualité des soins
  • Matronas liderando el camino con un cuidado de calidad 

Also… Every May is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) awareness month around the world.

As such….for , and EDS awareness month… I shared 10 top tips for caring for women with hypermobile Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (hEDS) during pregnancy birth and beyond. These tips come from my latest paper, authored in partnership with Dr. Gemma Pearce (@GemmaSPearce) and Dr. Emma Reinhold (@DrEReinhold ), entitled …

Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome during pregnancy, birth and beyond

Here, we present care considerations for midwives and the multidisciplinary team caring for this unique subgroup of childbearing women. However, we hope that women with hEDS will also benefit from this paper, as they make decisions in partnership with their professional health care teams. You can read the press release from this paper here.

I would personally like to thank the board members of the British Journal of Midwifery for making this article FREE for all to read. I would also like to thank the Royal college of Midwives for sharing news of the article here…and the Nursing Times for sharing further news here.

So what can midwives do to maximize the quality of care given to women with hEDS throughout pregnancy birth and beyond?…First of all….Know the facts…

  • There have been no prevalence studies since EDS received a major reclassification in 2017
  • Earlier estimates from 2006 suggest a prevalence rate of 0.75-2% for hyper mobile EDS
  • hEDS is the most common form of EDS
  • Up to 78% of women with hEDS could also have a diagnosis of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS)
  • POTS predominantly occurs in women of childbearing age
  • EDS is considered to remain largely under diagnosed.

Tips for midwives

  1. Discuss individual needs with women, as no two cases will be the same. Do this early, and always in partnership with the woman and the wider multidisciplinary healthcare team.
  2. Consider early referral to obstetric, physiotherapy and anaesthetic teams in partnership with the woman.
  3. Consider the need for alternate maternal positioning during pregnancy, birth and beyond. To minimise the risk of injury, positioning should be led by the mother.
  4. As wound healing can be problematic, the use of non-tension, non-dissolvable, deep double sutures, left in for at least 14 days is advisable.
  5. Wait longer for local anaesthetics to take effect and consider giving maximum dosage. Always be led by the mother on whether pain relief is sufficient
  6. Always consider the significance of a routine observation in light of existing POTS and/or EDS symptoms
  7. Promote spontaneous pushing rather than directed pushing during birth
  8. Promote effective pain management and the use of therapeutic birthing environments to promote reductions in stress
  9. Consider additional joint support for newborns suspected of having hEDS
  10. Document all joint dislocations and bruising marks on the newborn from birth to avoid misdiagnosis and/or wrongful accusations of mistreatment.

Research into EDS and childbearing is in it’s very early stages. We hope to build on this work to make a difference for all women with hEDS during pregnancy, birth and beyond.

pregnant belly

If you would like to follow the progress of this work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 

 

Posted by & filed under #CMALTcMOOC, CMALT, FuturePlans, SOTEL.

This week we cover an overview of digital publishing formats and CMALT portfolio submission requirements. We hope you have enjoyed your participation in #CMALTcMOOC 2018, and although the 7 weeks finishes at the end of this week, this is just the beginning for the community that has been established! We hope that you now have an understanding of what is required for producing a CMALT portfolio, and encourage you to continue working on developing and sharing your portfolios. You are invited to further PD cMOOCs such as

You are also invited to take part in a final participant survey to give us feedback. This week we will also host our final Participant Hangout reflecting upon their CMALT cMOOC experience.

cMOOC Feedback Invitation:

We want to get your feedback on how we can improve #CMALTcMOOC. We have an information sheet, consent form, and online survey for your feedback. Also, if you are willing to let us use your CMALT portfolio as an example there is also a portfolio showcase opt-in. The links are:

Info Sheet: http://bit.ly/1XywKQ5

Consent Form: http://bit.ly/26bPN4B

Survey: https://goo.gl/forms/cDhKGbGbudf221312

Portfolio showcase option: http://goo.gl/forms/J629u943tGsM4OGy2

Future Plans

Remember to check out the growing list of examples for the CMALT Portfolio sections in the Project Bank at https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/

While the “Future Plans” section is not assessed you must complete it. This can be as detailed as you like. The purpose of this is to help you plan for your professional development; it will also be useful when preparing to meet your continuing professional development requirement to remain in good standing.

This week we will also look at an overview of digital publishing formats suitable for an ePortfolio to be submitted for CMALT accreditation. Portfolios can be submitted for review by three different dates throughout the year: 31 January, 31 May, and 30 September https://www.alt.ac.uk/certified-membership/submitting-portfolio

 

CMALT ePortfolio Examples

A list of Australasian CMALT holders can be found at: http://ascilite.org/get-involved/cmalt/

Example AUT CMALT portfolios

Posted by & filed under CMALT, SOTEL.

This week we explore participants’ individual areas of specialisation in learning technologies. Use the Project Bank https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/ to share a Blog post or VODCast describing an area of specialisation relevant to your context.

We will also schedule a Hangout later in the week where participants can discuss and share their specialisations.

Reflect upon why you have chosen this specialisation?

Comment on one another’s PODCasts or VODCasts giving feedback.

As well as the core areas, CMALT candidates are required to demonstrate evidence of independent practice in one or more specialist options. This reflects the fact that, although there are common areas of work for learning technologists, practice is extremely diverse and everyone specialises in something different.

Your specialist topic should reflect an area where you have particular expertise. This may be unique to you or common across your team, but goes beyond what would be expected of any learning technologist.

In describing your specialist option you should refer to the CMALT principles and values:

  1. A commitment to exploring and understanding the interplay between technology and learning.
  2. A commitment to keep up to date with new technologies.
  3. An empathy with and willingness to learn from colleagues from different backgrounds and specialist options.
  4. A commitment to communicate and disseminate effective practice.
Because these are specialist options you should be clear what makes your work distinct from common practice; many people teach on online courses, but designing and delivering fully online courses requires specific skills and would be considered specialist. . Similarly, many teachers provide blended learning, but developing and sharing guidelines for such practice or working with a distinctive blend of contexts might distinguish your work as specialist. It may be that your specialist option is common amongst the group that you work in as you all work in a similar area; that is perfectly acceptable.Evidence for your specialist activity is likely to be very specific but could include: reports, papers or presentations you have written; this could be backed up by a job description plus written statements supporting your specialist knowledge from colleagues, clients or managers; active membership of professional or other bodies; certificates of completion of specialist training programmes or courses.

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Pros pic 1

How do we attract more students? How do we market beyond our physical location if we don’t have a budget for camera gear, editing software, and the small fact that we have very limited technical know-how? Well the answer is that there are a vast number of online options that are simple to use and either free, or very cost effective.

VIDEO NUMBER 1

The first marketing video we made was created using ClipChamp online https://clipchamp.com/en/products/create

2018-04-20 (4)

We recorded a multiple short clips on a variety of smartphones, laptops and personal digital cameras. These could be easily uploaded onto the website and then compiled into a sequence that flowed well. We had full editing capability and were able to cut the clips, add subtitles or titles and insert text between the clips. The finished video could then be downloaded as an mp4 file and then uploaded onto YouTube and Facebook and be shared by our staff and students. The resulting audience we could reach was so much larger than we anticipated.

 

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

download

This year began with quite a challenge for us at Annesbrook Leadership College. We launched a small campus in Pukekohe, Auckland but had no available local tutor. This meant we had to source an effective solution to teach those learners from our classrooms in Nelson via the internet. The major issue here was that we had no budget for video conferencing hardware and none of us on staff had ever used anything other than Skype before.

Having researched a variety of options, we decided to try Zoom (www.zoom.us) for these reasons:

  • It was free for our students to download
  • It can be used across all devices (PC, tablet, smartphone)
  • It operates on all platforms (Windows, Mac, iOS, Android)
  • We didn’t need to buy new hardware as we could use our own laptops.
  • It is really cost effective for one Pro license

The result has been excellent. We did have some teething issues to begin with around sound and integrating the remote students with the students in the classroom, however it only took us two sessions to resolve this and it is now working really well. One of the major benefits to the students is they can log in from home if they cannot get to class, which has been a wonderful solution to two of our learners who have babies. Another great feature is the recording function. We can record the classes and upload the video, or audio only file for students to watch/listen again.

 

Posted by & filed under #CMALTcMOOC, CMALT, SOTEL.

Collaboration and communication are key attributes for educators and our graduates. Laurillard et al., (2013) emphasise the benefits of collaborative curriculum design and the role of modelling collaboration and communication skills to our students. Weaver et al., (2012) also argue for the value of collaborative research to improve teaching practice. The fourth core area of a CMALT portfolio requires CMALT candidates to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in communication through evidence and reflection upon working with others.

Use the Project Bank to share examples of how you collaborate with your peers – this could be an interactive Google Map of research presentations or a team project, a G+ Community, a social media hashtag, a Twitter ‘Moment’ of a collaborative event, etc… Also a reminder to create an ORCID profile and share it with the #CMALTcMOOC G+ Community if you have not yet done so at http://orcid.org

For example, you can find a collection of ORCIDs from the ASCILITE Mobile Learning Special Interest Group at https://ascilitemlsig.wordpress.com/member-orcid-portfolios/

You can also find example collaborative SOTEL research clusters at http://sotel.nz/about-the-cluster/

We will schedule another group G+ Hangout for a live discussion this Thursday for UK participants and Friday morning 10:30am for NZ/AU participants – the archived Hangouts on YouTube are another form of evidence of “Collaboration”!

Hints:

In your CMALT portfolio: Evidence statements could describe the way in which your work involves collaboration, for example through participation in a team or acting as an interface to other groups.

Relevant evidence would include reflection on collaborations with others, reports outlining your activity within a team process, how you have brokered support for a particular initiative (for example from a technical or legal support service) or how you have worked with others to solve problems.Where your evidence involved collaboration, please acknowledge the contribution of others. You may also chose to discuss how you select appropriate forms of communication.Think how some of the tools we have explored throughout #cmaltcmooc could be used to provide evidence of communication and collaboration – for example a collaborative Vyclone video of you and your peers discussing an issue relevant to a course, or an archived Google Plus Hangout On Air with a guest lecturer or a working group, etc…

References:

Laurillard, D., Charlton, P., Craft, B., Dimakopoulos, D., Ljubojevic, D., Magoulas, G., . . . Whittlestone, K. (2013). A constructionist learning environment for teachers to model learning designs. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(1), 15-30. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2729.2011.00458.x doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2011.00458.x

Weaver, D., Robbie, D., Kokonis, S., & Miceli, L. (2012). Collaborative scholarship as a means of improving both university teaching practice and research capability. International Journal for Academic Development, 18(3), 237-250. doi:10.1080/1360144x.2012.718993