Posted by & filed under CMALT, Hangouts.

The first step is download the Google Hangouts App to your device or go to https://hangouts.google.com on your laptop/desktop. You will need to install the Hangouts plugin for your web browser on your laptop/desktop the first time – so do this well before the Hangout is due to start!

Hangouts On Air have three modes:

1. An interactive live discussion with up to 10 connections

2. A view only live stream of the discussion

3. A recorded view only of the Hangout archived on YouTube

The discussion invite URL will have the format:

https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts/_/5i63u3wwhza____________

The Moderator of the Hangout will send you this invite URL

The view only live stream or archive URL will have the format:

This will be available publicly once the Hangout On Air broadcast starts

To join a Hangout Live discussion you need an invitation from the creator of the Hangout – you should be sent an invitation that will popup either in the Hangouts App on your mobile device (if you are signed in with the same email as your G+ account) or via being signed in to the Web interface at https://hangouts.google.com

We will invite participants to join the Hangout discussion 5mins before starting the YouTube Live broadcast, so login to either the Hangouts App or the Hangouts web page early.

If you follow the creator of the YT Live Hangout you should get an automatic notification when the Hangout starts as well – My G+ name is +Thom Cochrane

If you simply click on the YouTube Live link for the Hangout you will be able to view the Hangout once the broadcast has started, but not join in the discussion directly  – although we will enable the text comment feature of YT Live.

Posted by & filed under CMALT.

The #CMALTcMOOC Signup process provides participants with a set of communication and collaboration tools (an Ecology of Resources), including: Email, Twitter, Blog, Google+ Community.

We suggest you start by creating a GMail account if you do not already have one, by either going to http://gmail.com or downloading the GMail App for your mobile device.

By Downloading the mobile Apps for each of these tools you will have easy and quick access to them on your mobile device where ever you are, and the first time you run the Apps you will be guided through the setup of your accounts. So head to the App Store (iOS) or Google Play Store (Android) and download the following Apps:

  • GMail – for receiving notifications and authenticating your social media accounts
  • Twitter – for sharing your ideas and building a global network with #cmaltcmooc
  • WordPress – for creating your eportfolio
  • Google Plus (G+) – for sharing and discussing resources and issues related to CMALT

Once you have your accounts setup then you can submit the #CMALTcMOOC signup form at https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com/contact

Posted by & filed under #CMALTcMOOC, CMALT, SOTEL.

We plan on launching the CMALT cMOOC again next week starting 19th March and it will run for 7 weeks until 4th May. The cMOOC is completely free and is aimed at participants sharing experiences as they explore developing CMALT eportfolios, and gaining a professional development experience.
We aim to have a G+ Hangout as an intro for anyone interested in the cMOOC 16th March Friday morning, 12 noon. There will be one for UK participants Thursday 15th March 10pm NZ time.
We use a G+ Community, Twitter, and WordPress to facilitate the cMOOC
The Signup form is on WordPress at https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com/contact/
And the weekly activities are at https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com
We us the #cmaltcmooc hashtag for Twitter and any other social media
You can find out more about the CMALT cMOOC at our ResearchGate Project Page:

Posted by & filed under #CMALTcMOOC, #sotelnz.

We plan on launching the CMALT cMOOC again next week starting 19th March and it will run for 7 weeks until 4th May. The cMOOC is completely free and is aimed at participants sharing experiences as they explore developing CMALT eportfolios, and gaining a professional development experience.
We aim to have a G+ Hangout as an intro for anyone interested in the cMOOC 16th March Friday morning, 12 noon. There will be one for UK participants Thursday 15th March 10pm NZ time.
We use a G+ Community, Twitter, and WordPress to facilitate the cMOOC
The Signup form is on WordPress at https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com/contact/
And the weekly activities are at https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com
We us the #cmaltcmooc hashtag for Twitter and any other social media
You can find out more about the CMALT cMOOC at our ResearchGate Project Page:

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Halló allir

Hope you are all well.

Myself and my friend Dan decided to take a small trip to Reykjavik Iceland for 4 nights and we had a great time. On the Tuesday we traveled from Manchester to Reykjavik which took just over 2 hours and was a great flight and probably one of the smoothest flights I have ever been on. We arrived and we had booked onto the coach service Greyline which is known to be the premier coach service for Reykjavik. The bus then transferred us to another small coach. We had arrived in the darkness so seeing any sites in the distance was quite hard. But we found the bus service was brilliant and comfortable service. We arrived to the Hallgrimskrkja Church that looked absolutely magnificent and can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. We arrived to the Guesthouse Andrea which where we were staying. It was pretty basic but comfortable considering we were going to be out for most of the time and it included a fridge and hobs for cooking. We went straight out and had a walk around and seemed quiet and pleasant and not as cold as I would have expected. We had a walk to the Harpa building which the architecture was amazing and looking up in the hexagon glass texture looked amazing as well. We stopped of for food at the Hard Rock Cafe and then called it a night after a long day of travelling.

The next day we had a walk around the local sculpture park which had some strange but amazing sculptures next to the Hallgrimskrkja Church, we then visited the church which was very full of tourists but was to be expected and looked just as amazing inside but was more modern than other churches I had visited before. We had a walk to the beach and got some amazing views of the surrounding mountainous areas. As well we got some pictures of the famous Sun Voyager steel boat sculpture next to the sea. We then went for the Lunch at the restaurant called Rustik which we had fish and chips which tasted amazing but was very different to the British fish and chips. The one thing I noticed going through was how quiet, calm the areas were and how people were so lovely to talk to. After lunch we had a walk to The National Museum of Iceland which was a great and interactive museum which held many great artifacts such as a section on going through the ages of living in Iceland to a big fishing boat as well as explaining when Christianity came to Iceland. We then went to the Harpa Building which is a massive concert and conference hall and we took in a 15 minute 4D Experience video of different locations in Iceland which was a really cool experience. We then took a trip to the Perlan Museum. Now this huge dome is like one huge water tank, We were hoping to go to the Ice Caves but unfortunately it was oversold so we went up to the observation deck where we got an amazing view of the whole of Reykjavik it was great and we saw for miles. We then went to a local Pizzeria which the Pizza there was very tasty and reasonably priced and then we called it a night after a long day of adventure.

On the Thursday our plan was to take a hike somewhere adventurous in Reykjavik, thankfully the weather was beautiful and we planned it well. So to get to the one we decided on we needed to take two buses one from Reykjavik to Artun, we stopped of here to get some Crampons and then to Esjuraetur Hiking Center where we would begin our hike to Stein which was apart of the Gonguleid a Pverfellshorn hike. Dan’s Crampons didnt suit his boots so it was worrying to begin with. Throughout the walk we came up against allot of snow, ice and slippery soil. We made as well a couple of mis-turns but we rectified it quickly. The walk was getting more challenging as there were some points which going up hill took more time and going over snow and ice made it worse. As well having a strong cold wind to battle with didn’t help. However the views throughout the whole journey were spectacular and just felt beautiful and amazing beeing out there. The decent got worse and we got to the most dangerous and challenging part and probably you can call stupid as well but there was a slope that was full of snow and ice and one slip you could have had it but we needed to go from right to left and had no choice but to go across it. We spotted some walkers ahead and they managed it across but they looked like they struggled so we decided to go further up as the distance to get to the other side narrowed. Dan decided to go across with a rock and by digging his feet into it and I went across crouching across. We did make it but was very worrying to the point i thought how we going to get across. I descended down to the walk path where Dan decided to go across the hill and he told me he fell over a few times. We finally got  to the touch point of Stein and looked amazing the views. To go to points 6 and 7 we would have needed an ice axe and a walking stick and would have been idiotic to go the way we were prepared. We then descended down the mountain and was easier then we expected and got down in about 1 hour. It was quite surprising considering it was challenging going up. But still was beautiful going down. Overall the walk took us about 4 hours and wasn’t that far but the challenge did tire us out. We then had to take two buses back to Reykjavik and we went back to the Rustik Restaurant where the meal and drink felt fitting and well deserved after the hiking challenge.

On the Friday our day trip was to the Blue Lagoon. It was an early start and a very cold morning to begin with. We took the coach we had booked to the Blue Lagoon and was great to see another part of Iceland on the journey. We arrived to the Blue Lagoon and we felt even more colder been here but was looking forward to been warm when we get inside. As we were early we spent some time in the shop as well as the cafe as we had a designated time to check in. We then got checked in and was given a waterproof wristband. We got changed and was looking forward to spending time in the spa as it looked so alluring. We felt the cold as soon as we exited the door to the outdoor spa and was looking forward to getting inside and once we did it was so relaxing and so soothing it was between 37-40 °C. If you spent any time out you felt the cold straight away so been neck deep most of the time was most ideal. We got a few drinks at the bar as you could drink while been in the spa. We also got a free mud mask while been there and we also spent a few minutes in the sauna, overall we spent a few hours here and felt great after the hike the day before. The last time bathing felt so soothing and relaxing was being in Peru but this felt like another level and this time I didn’t get sunburn. It was very relaxing and the recognition this place gets is well deserved. We then got the coach back to the city and got some food at Cafe Paris which was happy hour, and I ended up eating a chicken burger, the cafe was lovely with very nice staff. We ended the night by taking a walk to the Perlan Museum in which we researched that you can view some of the Northern lights from here. Only issue is that the Northern Lights have a 6pm-6am window so it can come anytime but we thought to go at 10am to midnight. Unfortunately it wasn’t dark enough really in the area to see them. However we did get one final view of the city at night and looked beautiful. We did manage to see some of the Northern Lights walking back to the hotel and it did look so beautiful of it dancing in the night. Overall it was a good relaxing day and was a fitting end to an amazing holiday to Iceland.

In conclusion it was a great relaxing adventurous trip to Iceland and my friend Dan also agreed. I would highly recommend going to anyone, it is a bit expensive (not as expensive as I initially thought) but i would certainly return again as there are so many places to go to and just amazed me how relaxed, patient, friendly and polite the city felt to me.

bless í bili

Posted by & filed under CMALT, SOTEL.

Joining the SOTEL Research Cluster
The SOTEL (Scholarship Of Technology Enhanced Learning) research clusters are designed to provide a hub for academics to build a community of researchers and a showcase of their scholarly research into their teaching practice. We welcome participants from any discipline context to join us and form associated research cluster groups at http://sotel.nz
We officially launched the SOTEL Research Cluster Group at the inaugural SOTEL Symposium on 15th February at AUT South Campus. We hope you will put the SOTEL Symposium in your annual event calendar!
To join the SOTEL Research cluster:
First signup to the WordPress site at the Join the Community! link http://sotel.nz/register/ and then Login once you have created a username and password at http://sotel.nz/wp-login.php
Next find the Research Cluster Group that you would like to join on the Groups page http://sotel.nz/groups/  and choose ‘Join Group’. Each group will have 1-2 Admins/Moderators who can manage and modify the group settings.
We aim to hold monthly online chats and webinars for the SOTEL research cluster groups, and will be running the CMALT cMOOC and MOSOMELT cMOOC again soon in 2018 if you are interested in participating.
Note if you are planning on submitting your CMALT portfolio the next submission date for CMALT Portfolio accreditation is 1 June 2018. The CMALT cMOOC is designed to create a supportive community of people exploring and building their CMALT eportfolios. https://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com
The MOSOMELT cMOOC is designed for participants to explore the potential of mobile social media in higher education http://mosomelt.wordpress.com

Posted by & filed under #CMALTcMOOC, #mosomelt, #sotelnz, SOTEL.

Joining the SOTEL Research Cluster
The SOTEL (Scholarship Of Technology Enhanced Learning) research clusters are designed to provide a hub for academics to build a community of researchers and a showcase of their scholarly research into their teaching practice. We welcome participants from any discipline context to join us and form associated research cluster groups at http://sotel.nz
We officially launched the SOTEL Research Cluster Group at the inaugural SOTEL Symposium on 15th February at AUT South Campus. We hope you will put the SOTEL Symposium in your annual event calendar!
To join the SOTEL Research cluster:
First signup to the WordPress site at the Join the Community! link http://sotel.nz/register/ and then Login once you have created a username and password at http://sotel.nz/wp-login.php
Next find the Research Cluster Group that you would like to join on the Groups page http://sotel.nz/groups/  and choose ‘Join Group’. Each group will have 1-2 Admins/Moderators who can manage and modify the group settings.
We aim to hold monthly online chats and webinars for the SOTEL research cluster groups, and will be running the CMALT cMOOC and MOSOMELT cMOOC again soon in 2018 if you are interested in participating.
Note if you are planning on submitting your CMALT portfolio the next submission date for CMALT Portfolio accreditation is 1 June 2018. The CMALT cMOOC is designed to create a supportive community of people exploring and building their CMALT eportfolios. http://cmaltcmooc.wordpress.com
The MOSOMELT cMOOC is designed for participants to explore the potential of mobile social media in higher education http://mosomelt.wordpress.com

Posted by & filed under #musings, academia, career, jobs, phd tips, Research, Research & writing tips, Student Tips, success, Tips, viva tips, viva voce.

This wisdom comes from the 10th annual ‘Life beyond the PhD’ conference () hosted at Cumberland Lodge. I was lucky enough to win a scholarship to attend and gather a multitude of hints and tips for my academic career…Now I plan to share them here for those who wish to read them…I have also experienced a viva voce examination…so these viva tips also come from me too.

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What is a viva voce?

In a nutshell it is the oral assessment of your PhD Thesis.

So your first viva tip would be….know how a PhD/doctorate/thesis is defined!…Here is a sample of some of the key phrases and expressions relating to ‘doctorateness’:

  • worthy of publication either in full or abridged form;

  • presents a thesis embodying the results of the research;

  • original work which forms an addition to knowledge;

  • makes a distinct contribution to the knowledge of the subject and offers evidence of originality shown by the discovery of new facts and/or the exercise of independent critical power;

  • shows evidence of systematic study and the ability to relate the results of such study to the general body of knowledge in the subject;

  • the thesis should be a demonstrably coherent body of work;

  • shows evidence of adequate industry and application;

  • understands the relationship of the special theme of the thesis to a wider field of knowledge;

  • represents a significant contribution to learning, for example, through the discovery of new knowledge, the connection of previously unrelated facts, the development of new theory or the revision of older views;

  • provides originality and independent critical ability and must contain matter suitable for publication;

  • adequate knowledge of the field of study;

  • competence in appropriate methods of performance and recording of research;

  • ability in style and presentation;

  • the dissertation is clearly written;

  • takes account of previously published work on the subject.

Source: Searching for ‘Doctorateness’.

The problem is…..that a range of literature has pointed out the variability in examination processes across universities, individual examiners, disciplines. Yup, this can be a fairly subjective process. So it is your job within your thesis and within your viva to make your case and convince your examiners that your work is indeed doctoral work.

Within Wellington’s (2013) framework for assessing ‘Doctorateness’, there are seven categories listed for which doctorates may contribute original knowledge. Therefore, in order for ‘Doctorateness’ to be unequivocally established for your thesis, it is important to apply the categories of this framework to each component of your research. The table below was added to my own thesis in order to prove how and why my work was indeed doctoral work.

Category number Category description Evidence
1 Building new knowledge, e.g. by extending previous work or ‘putting a new brick in the wall’. The Delphi method has been used previously to assess the workplace needs of midwifery populations (Hauck, Bayes and Robertson 2012). Yet the views and opinions of an expert panel about the design and development of an online intervention designed to support midwives in work-related psychological distress have been gathered and presented for the first time within this thesis.
2 Using original processes or approaches, e.g. applying new methods or techniques to an existing area of study. As the Delphi study presented within this thesis was a modified one, where the identity of experts remained unknown to the researcher, and free text response options accompanied each statement, it has also applied somewhat original processes and approaches to an existing area of study.

 

3 Creating new syntheses, e.g. connecting previous studies or linking existing theories or previous thinkers. Chapter one presents the first narrative review to integrate studies of midwives in work-related psychological distress (Pezaro et al. 2015). This original knowledge demonstrates how midwives working in rural, poorly resourced areas who experience neonatal and maternal death more frequently can experience death anxieties, where midwives working in urban and well-resourced areas do not. This creation of new syntheses connects previous studies and existing theories together to form new knowledge.

 

The mixed-methods systematic review presented within chapter three is the first of its kind to collate and present the current and available evidence in relation to existing interventions targeted to support midwives in work-related psychological distress (Pezaro, Clyne and Fulton 2017).

 

4 Exploring new implications, for either practitioners, policy makers, or theory and theorists. Chapter two makes an original contribution to ethical decision making, and may be extrapolated and applied to other healthcare professions who may also now consider the provision of confidential support online.
5 Revisiting a recurrent issue or debate, e.g. by offering new evidence, new thinking, or new theory. The original research presented in chapter two contributes to an ongoing academic dialogue in relation to ethical decision making.
6 Replicating or reproducing earlier work, e.g. from a different place or time, or with a different sample. The mixed-methods systematic review, presented in chapter three somewhat replicates earlier work from a different place, time, and with a different inclusion sample (Shaw, Downe and Kingdon 2015).

 

7 Presenting research in a novel way, e.g. new ways of writing, presenting, disseminating. The results of this research have been disseminated via popular media publications throughout. A further summary of this research is planned for publication. Furthermore, this research has also informed new guidance, published by the Royal College of Midwives, who also present the findings of this research in a new way. This new guidance is intended to guide heads of midwifery to support midwives experiencing work-related stress. Evidence of this can be found in Appendix 15.

 

Adapting this table to fit your own work should assist you in realizing how your own research can be argued to be doctoral work, both in your thesis and in your viva. Once this argument is clear in your own mind, your confidence should rise and enable you to direct your thoughts towards a really positive goal. Getting your PhD!…and not just because you want it, but because you are worthy of it! You have worked really hard for this opportunity, and seeing your work match up to this framework can really help you to visualize your successes. But now there are other things you can do to help you prepare…

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Viva tips

Just because you have submitted your thesis, this does not mean you can sit back a relax until your viva day. Following a short break, and with fresh eyes, you should be revisiting your thesis and getting to know it really well. Also, be sure to keep up to date with any new research arising in your field, it may well be discussed in your viva!

Get to know your university’s policies and procedures. This will help you to prepare for how the viva voce may play out on the day. As your examiners will be drawing upon their own expertise, make sure that you also have a broad knowledge of their work!

Pick your battles. Fighting every point can be really jarring for everyone in the room, and your examiners need to see that you can accept constructive criticism and reflect. Decide what you will really defend, and what you are willing to let go of. This means that you will need to anticipate what your examiners may ask you. Here, it is a good idea to mock up some practice questions. Try defending the questions you fear most. This will help you to face your demons and formulate your arguments….constructively. An extra tip here would be to record yourself arguing your points. How do you sound? are you believable? How do you come across?

Having your supervisor with you can be very reassuring and comforting, although they may well not be allowed to speak during your viva voce. However, try to have them sit next to you or behind you, as eye contact or some other gestures, however well meaning may put you off your game.

Once you get to the viva, be prepared to break the ice. Your examiners are not ogres. They want you to pass! Starting your viva with a warm greeting can set the tone for the session, so don’t start with your defensive wall up too high! You can also set the scene with a short presentation to cover some broad points you anticipate coming up. Use this time to also show your knowledge and demonstrate your own unique way of thinking and working.

If there has been a long gap between your thesis submission and your viva, you may now have moved on to new ways of thinking or changed your original work to move on to a new project. Remember that this new work does not count in your viva. You must remain focused on what you submitted.

If the discussion moves to really complex debates, it is important to keep your cool, remain professional and don’t turn into a robot who has learnt their responses off by heart. Also, don’t be overly humble or point out your own weaknesses directly…if they are raised by the examiners, then you can show respectful considerations to other methods, but it is still important not to shoot yourself in the foot.

Your viva can last a good few hours…it is basically a brain marathon! So you will need to prepare both mentally and physically. This means de-stressing, eating and sleeping well…and generally giving time to your own self care regime. If you need a break during the session, don’t be afraid to ask for one. If you feel overwhelmed at any time, take a constructive pause to write or read and deliberate. It can’t be an extremely emotional and draining experience.

However, some people can enjoy their viva. After all, you will be speaking about your own work with experts in the field for some time. This is a chance to show off, be proud of what you have achieved and even learn more! Thinking in this positive way may make the viva experience not seem so daunting.

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I personally found my own viva experience very daunting, emotional and stressful. However, my examiners were not ogres…they too wanted me to pass and to help me make the best of my work… Following the submission of my revised thesis, I realized how much better my thesis now is because of this viva process and the input of my examiners. Having now gone beyond the viva process, I believe that I have truly earned my PhD. I worked hard for it. It didn’t come easy. It was a brain marathon. But would a PhD really be worth having if it was easy to achieve?

I can also now reflect on this process and learn from it. It is an experience that will certainly stay with me and enrich my future work. I hope it will also enable me to improve my own examination and supervisory skills in future.

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 

 

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Yesterday I presented a “case study” reflecting on my journey of embedding 360 blended learning into a third-year physiotherapy paper. This was at the inaugural #Sotelnz conference held at AUT University, Auckland- with over 70 delegates attending. While there were some similarities to the collaborative presentation at ASCILITE 2017, this presentation was focused on the changing from a Teaching Led tutorial to a Student Led approach that incorporated an online integrated learning experience.
As this was something developed over 6 months ago- I was regretting not reflecting at the time the process that I had journeyed through. As with all changes, it was met with some challenges. There was the need to ensure that there was consistency with other content delivered within the paper; buy-in from the Paper Coordinator that I could run with it; as too the students- this was something that was new to us all- and was different in delivery from what the students were familiarised with the previous two and a half years of their physiotherapy programme. It took some learning (and many drafts of the environment) in order to facilitate the presentation of the online environment as clearly and concisely as possible.
In the presentation, I outlined my initial apprehensions in delivering using a blended learning approach. Before reading more about what blending learning actually incorporated and how was defined- I naively believed I was already utilising elements of blended learning. It is hard to relay that in a presentation to peers- though, there it is…
I looked back at some of the presentations that I had presented prior to commencing #MosoMelt and #CMALTcMOOC- and is personally encouraging to see some differences- both for the purpose of presenting, though more importantly, what has been utilised in my teaching over the past year- links to Google Drive; inclusion of QR Codes and TinyURL or Bit.ly links; embedding of video, use of the 360 camera and online editing software (www.seakbeak.com; http://www.storyboardthat.com)- even inclusion of Twitter hashtags and names… much to the surprise of @thomcochrane!
My last reflection of this presentation was that I felt… …“at home”. Here I was with like-minded people that shared a common passion- and concern- about the future of tertiary and secondary education. Here were people who were demonstrating consideration of how education is delivered, rather than being constrained to just the content. It was nice to hear Keynote speaker Professor Peter Scott (University of Technology Sydney) mention that “If you are thinking about teaching without the content being the focus, you are starting to consider teaching in a new way…”. This is something that needs to be strongly highlighted in the changing face of tertiary education and expectations of both institute management as well as the next generation of digital-ready learners entering university.
Makes you think- “Are we ready…” More importantly- “Am I ready…”?
SoTEL Twitter Shot Stretton