Posted by & filed under LearnTech News.

Upcoming changes to Inline Grading

The third party service (known as the Crocodoc plug-in) used by Blackboard’s inline grading tool is being discontinued and replaced. If you are using Blackboard’s inline grading to give students feedback, this information is for you.

Box, the provider of the service used by inline grading, have announced that Crocodoc will no longer be supported after 15 January 2018, and that all users will therefore need to start using the replacement, New Box View.

What is inline grading?

Inline grading is the ability to use a web browser to annotate student attempts on a Blackboard assignment. The screenshot below shows a student’s assignment attempt:

 

Are you affected by this?

You are only affected if you use Blackboard assignments to collect and feedback on your students’ work, and if you use the inline grading tools to annotate.

The ‘Feedback to Learner’ box (right hand side of the screenshot, above) is not affected.

Does this apply to Turnitin?

No, Turnitin is a separate plug-in.

What is going to happen next?

The LearnTech team have been testing the New Box View, as well as how it will affect the other features of Blackboard, prior to making the switch.

We will update you with further guidance via the LearnTech blog prior to switching over, so watch this space.

New Box view will be activated on 3 January 2018; we wanted to give you some advanced notice so that you can make any necessary adjustments, as guided by the following information.

What about existing work marked in Crocodoc?

Any assignments currently graded with the Crocodoc function will be migrated automatically over to New Box View.

Annotations made in Crocodoc will not be editable once they have been migrated to New Box View– they will be burned into the document.This applies to all existing annotations on a submission in Crocodoc – regardless of whether it has yet been released to students or not.

 

What will change?

Comparison of New Crocodoc and New Box View
Crocodoc New Box View
File types .pdf, .ppt, .pptx, .xls, .xlsx, .doc, .docx Over 100 different file types
Annotation types Text and point-based comments, highlighting, and drawing Point-based comments and highlighting
Download You can download a copy of a student file with the option to download in the original format or in a PDF version that includes the annotations You can download a copy of a student file, but annotations won’t appear

Where can I read more?

Blackboard’s Help site has more detailed information on the transition from Crocodoc to New Box View.

As previously mentioned, we will be posting more information on the LearnTech blog, as well as the NILE welcome page for staff.

Who can I contact?

Contact the Learntech Support team with any questions: learntech@northampton.ac.uk.

Posted by & filed under academia, Conferences, Research.

The virtual international conference, hosted by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM)  is the first online conference focused on the subject of qualitative research. I gravitated towards this as something new, exciting and inclusive. Plus, as my new daughter has just been born….a virtual online conference seemed to be the perfect way to share my latest work and breastfeed at the same time.

The poster I presented was:

Exploring the perceptions of new mother’s in relation to psychological distress and workplace support in midwifery. A Patient and Public Involvement study

I was representing The Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course at Coventry University. This work was formed in partnership with Dr. Gemma Pearce and Dr. Elizabeth Bailey, also from Coventry University.

Qual-World Interactive Virtual Conference

The conference theme was: Qualitative Research Across Boundaries

Keynote Speakers:

Prof. Amanda Kenny, La Trobe University, Australia
Prof. Trish Greenhalgh, University of Oxford, UK
Prof. Martyn Hammersley, The Open University, UK
Prof. Babette Babich, Fordham University, The Jesuit University of New York City

Here are a few snapshots of the keynote speeches…

As an early career researcher (post-doc) I really appreciated the insights shared in relation to progressing an academic career and thriving in a research centre. The idea that collaborations and publications can be planned to achieve maximum impact really appeals to me…. a few hints and tips in the right direction were very welcome.

I have yet to use or explore storytelling and narratives in my research career thus far in any great depth. As such, it was really inspiring to see how these have been used in other qualitative work. Ethnography is also an area fairly new to me, and so being introduced to new topics in this way really helped me to digest and think about new directions for my own research.

Then, to  fall in love with philosophy again was wonderful…looking at what makes science….science….within the terminology of the postmodern? Lot’s to think about here. And certainly lot’s to discuss. The online chat room was on the go throughout the conference, and on Twitter. The conversations really made me think about my own future directions in research and how it may be grounded.

Yet the best thing about this conference for me was the fact that it has been so accessible for me. Having just had a new baby girl, this conference gave me the chance to share new findings from our PPI study from the comfort of home. This meant that I could care for my baby and breastfeed whilst not missing out on the career I love. Thank you to the conference organizers for making this possible. …and thank you to the Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course for funding my place.

As you can see, this tweet of my experience was the most popular one of the conference… I think that these accessible conferences are really making history and showing the way for future conferences of this type.

In conclusion…I would like to reiterate the following tweet:

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤


Posted by & filed under CMALT, Future Plans.

This week we cover an overview of digital publishing formats and CMALT portfolio submission requirements. We hope you have enjoyed your participation in #CMALTcMOOC, and although the 7 weeks comes to an end this is just the beginning for the community that has been established! We hope that you now have an understanding of what is required for producing a CMALT portfolio, and encourage you to continue working on developing and sharing your portfolios. You are invited to further PD cMOOCs such as Mosomelt 2018 and the next iteration of #CMALTcMOOC (March 2018). You are also invited to take part in a final participant survey to give us feedback. This week we will also host our final Participant Hangout reflecting upon their CMALT cMOOC experience.

cMOOC Feedback Invitation:

We want to get your feedback on how we can improve #CMALTcMOOC. We have an information sheet, consent form, and online survey for your feedback. Also, if you are willing to let us use your CMALT portfolio as an example there is also a portfolio showcase opt-in. The links are:

Info Sheet: http://bit.ly/1XywKQ5

Consent Form: http://bit.ly/26bPN4B

Survey: https://goo.gl/forms/cDhKGbGbudf221312

Portfolio showcase option: http://goo.gl/forms/J629u943tGsM4OGy2

 

 

Remember to check out the growing list of examples for the CMALT Portfolio sections in the Project Bank at https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/

While the “Future Plans” section is not assessed you must complete it. This can be as detailed as you like. The purpose of this is to help you plan for your professional development; it will also be useful when preparing to meet your continuing professional development requirement to remain in good standing.

 

This week we will also look at an overview of digital publishing formats suitable for an ePortfolio to be submitted for CMALT accreditation. Portfolios can be submitted for review by three different dates throughout the year: 31 January, 31 May, and 30 September https://www.alt.ac.uk/certified-membership/submitting-portfolio


Posted by & filed under Choosing a Specialisation, CMALT.

This week we explore participants’ individual areas of specialisation in learning technologies. Use the Project Bank https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/ to share a Blog post or VODCast describing an area of specialisation relevant to your context.

We will also schedule a Hangout later in the week where participants can discuss and share their specialisations.

Reflect upon why you have chosen this specialisation?

Comment on one another’s PODCasts or VODCasts giving feedback.

As well as the core areas, CMALT candidates are required to demonstrate evidence of independent practice in one or more specialist options. This reflects the fact that, although there are common areas of work for learning technologists, practice is extremely diverse and everyone specialises in something different.

Your specialist topic should reflect an area where you have particular expertise. This may be unique to you or common across your team, but goes beyond what would be expected of any learning technologist.

In describing your specialist option you should refer to the CMALT principles and values:

  1. A commitment to exploring and understanding the interplay between technology and learning.
  2. A commitment to keep up to date with new technologies.
  3. An empathy with and willingness to learn from colleagues from different backgrounds and specialist options.
  4. A commitment to communicate and disseminate effective practice.
Because these are specialist options you should be clear what makes your work distinct from common practice; many people teach on online courses, but designing and delivering fully online courses requires specific skills and would be considered specialist. . Similarly, many teachers provide blended learning, but developing and sharing guidelines for such practice or working with a distinctive blend of contexts might distinguish your work as specialist. It may be that your specialist option is common amongst the group that you work in as you all work in a similar area; that is perfectly acceptable.Evidence for your specialist activity is likely to be very specific but could include: reports, papers or presentations you have written; this could be backed up by a job description plus written statements supporting your specialist knowledge from colleagues, clients or managers; active membership of professional or other bodies; certificates of completion of specialist training programmes or courses.

Posted by & filed under Choosing a Specialisation, CMALT.

This week we explore participants’ individual areas of specialisation in learning technologies. Use the Project Bank https://cmaltcmooc.mosomelt.org/project-bank/ to share a Blog post or VODCast describing an area of specialisation relevant to your context.

We will also schedule a Hangout later in the week where participants can discuss and share their specialisations.

Reflect upon why you have chosen this specialisation?

Comment on one another’s PODCasts or VODCasts giving feedback.

As well as the core areas, CMALT candidates are required to demonstrate evidence of independent practice in one or more specialist options. This reflects the fact that, although there are common areas of work for learning technologists, practice is extremely diverse and everyone specialises in something different.

Your specialist topic should reflect an area where you have particular expertise. This may be unique to you or common across your team, but goes beyond what would be expected of any learning technologist.

In describing your specialist option you should refer to the CMALT principles and values:

  1. A commitment to exploring and understanding the interplay between technology and learning.
  2. A commitment to keep up to date with new technologies.
  3. An empathy with and willingness to learn from colleagues from different backgrounds and specialist options.
  4. A commitment to communicate and disseminate effective practice.
Because these are specialist options you should be clear what makes your work distinct from common practice; many people teach on online courses, but designing and delivering fully online courses requires specific skills and would be considered specialist. . Similarly, many teachers provide blended learning, but developing and sharing guidelines for such practice or working with a distinctive blend of contexts might distinguish your work as specialist. It may be that your specialist option is common amongst the group that you work in as you all work in a similar area; that is perfectly acceptable.Evidence for your specialist activity is likely to be very specific but could include: reports, papers or presentations you have written; this could be backed up by a job description plus written statements supporting your specialist knowledge from colleagues, clients or managers; active membership of professional or other bodies; certificates of completion of specialist training programmes or courses.

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

This blog aligns with the CMALT accreditation core area 4: Collaboration and Communication- “Relevant evidence would include… …how you have worked with others to solve problems.”
Describe
During the last week of one of our third year modules (Managing Complexity in the Acute Care Environment) we provide students an opportunity to reflect on- and “self check” their current knowledge before study week (and examination). We provide problem-based learning throughout the semester alongside the examination case scenarios. This made another “mock” scenario in the final lecture redundant, with detail then covered in the week tutorials. Another issue was that some staff were not available for the final lecture, though a “self check” to encourage student centred feedback was deemed beneficial.
I suggested to the Paper Coordinator that with the front end of the lecture comprising a “what to expect” presentation (providing students with expectations of process on coming to the examination, timing, example questions related to learning outcomes and a short question time), I could organise a quiz to address specific learning outcomes for the second half of the lecture (45min). To enable this, I asked the relevant lecturers to provide me questions along with multi-choice answers (Evidence 1). These were included in a Google Form (Quiz) and a shortened link and QR code was provided to the students in the lecture (Evidence 2). Students completed the quiz in the lecture and were provided an overview of the “current”results based on those already submitted. Once all had completed the quiz (n=110), individual scores and correct answers were released to the respective student’s email address.
Reflection
What was great about using Google Forms for the quiz (rather than what was available through our university platform), was that as lecturers, we had a “real time” account of what the students were up to, and what questions they found difficult. For example, the report of Responses indicated the “frequently missed questions” which include questions with a correct response of less than 50%. With the first of six tutorials occurring straight after the lecture, any issues could be addressed promptly in those sessions based on the responses. The Google Form (quiz) also allowed students to work at their own pace as we had provided additional time to what we timed the quiz to take 35 minutes. Some completed in 30 minutes, others completed just outside the lecture time. It also provided students some delayed feedback- with a comparison with others who had completed. This acted basically as a prompt “kick-in-the-pants” for those that needed it 2-3 weeks out from the exam; and a “pat-on-the-back” for others that had scored well. We chose not to look at the individual scores and single students out (was a formative assessment), though we did provide an opportunity for students to contact us or ask questions in the remaining tutorial time and/ or via email.
While the learning was based on memory recall prompting reinforcement of acquired knowledge (Behaviourism- Brown, 2006) and supporting a teacher centred approach to learning; it did align with the module’s learning outcomes and provided the students an indication of the depth of questioning we would be using during the assessment (Constructive Alignment- Biggs & Tang, 2011).
What resulted from this quiz, was a more interactive review lab and better results for the module compared to previous year. While there were some other minor changes with the delivery of the assessment, the formative “nudge” for the student to have some feedback on their current knowledge status in preparation for the examination, did have some positive influence…
Reference
Biggs, J. & Tang, C. (2011).Teaching for Quality Learning at University: What the Student Does.(4th Ed). McGraw Hill: Berkshire, England.
Brown, T. H. (2006). Beyond constructivism: navigationism in the knowledge era. On the Horizon, 14(3), 108-120. Doi: 10.1108/10748120610690681.

Posted by & filed under Library & Learning Services, resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just a couple of weeks to go before Resources Week takes place on both of our campuses.

This event is for everyone to enjoy and will include resource demonstrations from providers such as Sage, Taylor & Francis and Mintel, as well as supplier stands, competitions and free donuts (look out for Donuts & Digital Resources on the Tuesday).

Please come along and join in and encourage your students to sign up to some of the sessions and find out what digital resources are available to help them with their research.

There are timetables for both campuses - just follow the links within the timetables to book on any of the sessions that interest you. Whether you are a staff member, a student or a researcher, there really is something for everyone!

Joanne Farmer and Hannah Woods

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

This ecology of resources is for a level one foundation course for which the targeted learner is the one who has not been very successful in the formal secondary school setting. The aim is motivate them to learn by exploring other ways of learning and thinking and talking about their thinking and how they learn. We have therefore looked at the the tools that teenage learners use in their everyday lives which we could incorporate in their educational journey because these help to :
  • Engage them-the use of social media tools was agreed on because learners are familiar with them already and it helps them to communicate, interact and socialise within an educational environment. Most of them do not want to communicate because they have encountered failure before, so by letting them use social media in their learning journeys, they will initiate communication while experiencing emotional and social engagement without even thinking about it or worrying about failing.
  • The use of social media is under girded by the social learning theory (Bandura) and the social constructivist theory (Vygotsky) where these learners are learning from one another through observation, imitation and modelling and knowledge is co-created along the way.
  • Social media helps to flip the classroom such that these not so motivated students learn so much out of the classroom sometimes without even realising it and that learning can be followed up, refined and extended in the classroom.
  • Social media tools can also be used to improve their their reading and writing with support from their tutors and peers. they are also going to be used for assessment as they capture and reflect on their learning and and storing it in their online portfolios.
  • This way of learning has never been trialed with this cohort of students but i guess we will see the results next year when the programme runs and then evaluate.ecology of resources 2